Looking up towards Tillicoultry Glen and Kirk Craigs in the Ochil Hills
Tillicoultry street scene, and the Ochil Hills
View of water fountain in Upper Mill Street in Tillicoultry, with backdrop of the Ochil Hills
Tillicoultry
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Apart from the Ochil Hills, there are no regular tourist attractions in Tillicoultry; no castle, no museum, and no quaint cottage with an old woman in period costume knitting. All there is for those not keen on walking is a big shop: Sterling Mills. In fact, for Tillicoultry, Sterling Mills is probably a tourist attraction. But tourists must get confused. Sterling sounds a bit like the nearby town of Stirling, and visitors perhaps think Sterling Mills is in Sterling and where's Sterling Castle anyway? The big shop that is Sterling Mills occupies what was once a mill, and Tillicoultry was indeed once quite famous for the quality of the woollen goods made in the town's mills. But, like nearby Alva, all that industry has gone.
But do you know what really annoys me? Near the big Sterling Mills shop there is what they term an Outlet Village. It is a name that conjures up images of goods straight from the factory or mill, and while some goods for sale therein may indeed come direct from a factory, they don't come from any factory or mill in Tillicoultry, because there isn't any. It's as if both the Outlet Village and the big Sterling Mills shop are trying to pretend that a mill still exists and that fine tartan and woollen goods are still made in Tillicoultry. They're not. And what annoys me even more is that most folk who visit Sterling Mills and the Outlet Village probably don't go anywhere near Tillicoultry's streets to sup soup in its cafes or ale in its pubs. That's what annoys me.
KIRK CRAIGS IN THE OCHIL HILLS
THE OCHIL HILLS AT TILLICOULTRY
VIEW OF THE OCHIL HILLS
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How to
GET THERE


You can get a bus to Tillicoultry from Stirling or Alloa.
Scotland’s online tourist guide – tartan hippo logo