Beinh an t-Sidhein towers over the village of Strathyre
View of Strathyre around the Main Street
View from the Rob Roy Way between Strathyre and Balquhidder
Strathyre
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My old 1920s 'Blue Guide to Scotland'  had this to say about Strathyre: a quiet village and summer-resort, is a good centre for walks. And that about sums it up. Not sure what else I can say to fill this little space. The village is very small, and facilities, like the bus service, are limited. There is no McDonald's fast food joint, no shopping centre, no fish and chip shop, no flashing neon lights, and no public toilets in which you might pee. There's not even a set of traffic-lights! You might step off the bus and two minutes later think, 'Now what?' But all that is in Strathyre's favour. It's a place where houses in the main street nestle in the shadows of mountains that tower over the village. It is outstandingly pretty.
The countryside here is some of the best that Scotland has to offer. The tree-quilted slopes of mountains like Beinh an t-Sidhein provide a haven for spirits and sprites who sneak between branches watching over all that goes on. For no matter where you are in the countryside around Strathyre, there will always be a little special beastie watching your every move as you trek along the paths and trudge through the terrain. And when you have returned to your hotel room (Strathyre has a humble hotel and an inn), your mind refreshed and your body all a-tingle, they will emerge from the forest with brushes and spades and sweep and sort and rearrange the fallen leaves so it all looks pretty for the next human who comes along.
MOUNTAINS AT STRATHYRE
MAIN STREET IN STRATHYRE
SCENERY ON THE ROB ROY WAY
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How to
GET THERE
You can get a bus to Strathyre from Callander, or from Stirling, which has a main-line railway station. Bus service is infrequent.
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