View from Stirling Castle esplanade towards Stirling Bridge and the National Wallace Monument
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  GOOD THINGS TO SEE AND DO IN STIRLING
STIRLING CASTLE
You can't visit Stirling and not pop into the castle. It's as good a castle as you'll get, with dungeons and cannons and steaming kitchens and views all over the surrounding district, possibly as far as The Highlands. King James V's Renaissance palace has recently been refurbished, and the result is a sumptuous feast of colourful craftsmanship in fabric and wood and all manner of things. Magnificent.
THE BACK WALK
The Back Walk is a splendid short walk from opposite the tourist office on Dumbarton Road right up to Stirling Castle. It skirts the old town wall and offers views over the flat land around the crag on which the town was built. Near the castle, you are recommended to enter the old graveyard and climb onto what is known as Ladies Rock, where the views are quite simply stunning. But watch your footing.
BAKER STREET
This is but one of Stirling's many streets, and a small stroll along it will give a flavour of the real Stirling. It is a street that is struggling to survive against the huge shopping centre that is eating up the town. Once, not too long ago, there was a pet shop, a book shop, and a model shop. They've all gone, and the shops that currently exist could do with your custom. If you want to see Stirling, and not just Stirling Castle, then this is where you should be, in the heart of the town.
THE NATIONAL WALLACE MONUMENT, CAUSEWAYHEAD
Possibly the most impressive monument in all of Scotland. You can't miss it - it's that big pointy thing that's visible for miles around. Built in the Victorian period, it commemorates the life of Sir William Wallace, a great warrior who led the Scots against the domineering English and whacked their butts at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297. It sits on top of a rocky crag at Causewayhead, about two miles to the north of Stirling. If you fancy a walk to The National Wallace Monument, I would recommend going via Cambuskenneth, in whose ruined abbey one of our Scottish kings lies buried. See the DIY Day Tour below.
THE SOUPSAYER'S DIY DAY TOUR - THE WARRIOR WALK
The Soupsayer has devised a tour for you. It's a do-it-yourself walk from Stirling to the National Wallace Monument. The walk comprises a rough map and route details, one file for each. In order for you to print them out at full A4 size instead of a smaller web page size, you should click the links below and save the files to your computer (go to 'File' then 'Save As..' on your task bar near the top of the page). Then, open them using, for example, Windows Picture and Fax Viewer, and print them, adjusting your print preferences if required so as to give full A4 images. Each file should be printed out on either side of the same A4 sheet of paper. Please note that the complete tour is about two miles long, is not suitable for prams, and includes a path that passes very close to a dangerous sheer drop. Click HERE for the 'Warrior Walk' map(Stirling to the National Wallace Monument, via Cambuskenneth), and HERE for route details. And remember, be careful out there (especially as orcs live in the forest near the monument).
BLAIR DRUMMOND SAFARI AND ADVENTURE PARK
About 5 miles to the north-west of the town, near the village of Doune, and a short bus journey away. There are too many things to list, but they've got elephants, and that's all you need. Show me a sign that says, 'Elephant this way,' and you've got me hook, line and sinker. I might add that their promotional leaflet mentions 'Animal Experiences,' which is perhaps something to dwell upon as you make your way straight there. (Closes during winter.)
STIRLING SMITH ART GALLERY AND MUSEUM
Formerly known as The Smith Institute, this is an excellent museum located on Dumbarton Road. It was established in 1874, and is a wonderful old building full of stuff, like the oldest football in the world (dating to some time before 1540), the oldest curling stone in the world (dating to 1511), and the Stirling Jug dating to 1457. For some unfathomable reason tourists don't visit museums as much as they should but, then, tourists are generally pretty daft and quite sheep-like. If you want to root around amidst the stuff of long ago and learn things, then the Stirling Smith Art Gallery and Museum is where you should go. You can pop down hill to it from the Back Walk. (Closes Mondays)
STIRLING OLD TOWN JAIL, ST. JOHN STREET
This is a very scary place located just down from the castle. They have actors inside, and a certain amount of audience participation is involved. It is not so much like visiting a tourist attraction as being locked up for a while in the dark and foreboding interior of a Victorian prison. Best take a spare set of undies. (Closes in winter.)
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DIY walk from Stirling to the Wallace Monument via Cambuskenneth (The Warrior Walk)
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The Back Walk in Stirling, under snow
The foot of Baker Street, Stirling
The National Wallace Monument, Stirling, silhouetted at dusk
elephant
Stirling Smith Art Gallery and Museum, Stirling
Stirling Old Town Jail entrance
Check our shop for books on Stirling and William Wallace