Newark Castle, Port Glasgow
View of old mangles, sinks and washing equipment inside the Old Laundry of Finlaystone County Estate, near Port Glasgow
A replica of SS Comet in Port Glasgow
Port Glasgow
RETURN TO THE GOOD SOUP GUIDE
A - Z
The name 'Port Glasgow' is probably a bit of a clue as to what makes the town of Port Glasgow tick. The town was founded in 1668 as the port for the city of Glasgow, at a time when the River Clyde was not deep enough to allow a port in Glasgow itself. The whole section of the Clydeside between Woodhall and Greenock was once a hive of activity: shipyards and sundry industries either needed to build ships or there to take advantage of the prime import and export location. If I tell you that SS Comet - 'the first steam-powered vessel in Europe to carry fare-paying passengers' - was launched from John Wood's shipyard in Port Glasgow in 1812, and that some 200 years later, in 2012, a pioneering hybrid ferry, the Hallaig, was launched from Ferguson's shipyard in Port Glasgow, then it's not difficult to see how important the town has been in pushing shipbuilding boundaries for over two centuries. While some heavy industry still exists in Port Glasgow, it is nothing like it once was. And where once there were thousands of working men with money to spend, now there is just a fraction of that, and great emphasis has been placed on tourism and the town's distinguished past. New sculpture has been created, modern squares fashioned, and a replica of SS Comet set in place. And when you wander around the Port Glasgow of today, through areas that can feel a little uninspiring, you only have to cast your eyes to the many huge cranes that still line the river, testament to a truly groundbreaking past and a most promising future.
NEWARK CASTLE, PORT GLASGOW
OLD LAUNDRY, FINLAYSTONE
REPLICA OF SS COMET
Advertisements
How to
GET THERE


You can get a train to Port Glasgow from Glasgow Central Railway Station.
Scotland’s online tourist guide – tartan hippo logo