The Bruce Arms and Main Street, Limekilns
Rosyth Church ruins, by Limekilns
The Fife Coastal Path between Limekilns and Rosyth
Limekilns
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Limekilns is a village on the coast, in the East Neuk of Fife. It's typical of the many villages and small towns in the area, in that it has a certain quaintness about it with a few crow-stepped gables, red roof pantiles and all that sort of thing. That said, it's nowhere near as quaint or charming as, say, Culross, but it is still fairly charming, perhaps scoring two out of ten on the NCS (National Charming Scale). There's not, it has to be said, a great deal to do in the place other than to stand and scan roof-tops for evidence that crows do use these steps, or to look out for seagulls tap-dancing on grass (which seagull first thought it could tap-dance like rain and so entice worms to the surface, that's what I'd like to know). But the whole area bristles with history. My old Blue Guide to Scotland tells me that in the mid-twentieth century, in a big house near Limekilns, the sword and helmet of Robert the Bruce was kept, a fact I find most fascinating. Where are they now, I wonder?
But the main thing about Limekilns today is that it sits on the Fife Coastal Path, a stupendous long-distance walking route that can take the avid explorer from Kincardine all the way to St Andrews, passing though some of the finest, most atmospheric little towns you will find anywhere in the world. And while there might not be a great deal to do in Limekilns itself, it is certainly a place that walkers on this truly awesome path will pass through, maybe stop for some food and drink, or rest their weary head.
MAIN STREET, LIMEKILNS
ROSYTH CHURCH RUINS
FIFE COASTAL PATH
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How to
GET THERE

You can get a bus to Limekilns from Dunfermline, which has a railway station with trains to/from Edinburgh.
Scotland’s online tourist guide – tartan hippo logo