Barony Chambers and the Auld Kirk, Kirkintilloch
The Perry Bandstand, Peel Park, Kirkintilloch
The Barony Chambers clock-tower, Kirkintilloch
Kirkintilloch
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When I arrived in Kirkintilloch to carry out research for this guide I found the place awash with Christians. It was Easter, and progress to the town centre was hampered by religious folk who ambled silently along the pavement behind a guy wielding a huge wooden cross. It took me some time to find a way through, and for a while I had no option but to become a part of their ceremonial procession, frequently struggling to resist a powerful urge to elbow a Christian in the ribs. But no sooner did I think I had escaped than they would turn a corner and head in my direction with all the solemnity of a child whose chocolate bunny is melting. It came as something of a relief to find it wasn't me they were going to crucify. I wouldn't want you to think that Kirkintilloch is an overtly religious place. It's not. Like so many small Scottish towns it was once a place of great industry, everything from iron founding to boat building and coal mining. Sadly, all that remains to add to the town's coffers is tourism, but I don't hold out a lot of hope there. The Auld Kirk Museum - the only visitor attraction - was shut over the Easter Weekend, a period of national holiday when folk visit things, like museums. It beggars belief.
But all is not lost, for there are many delightful walks in the area, and all are free and open always (for now - it's probably only a matter of time before we have gates and men in peaked caps and questions like, 'Are you a member?' at which point I shall probably either self-combust or become a Christian).
THE AULD KIRK MUSEUM
PERRY BANDSTAND, PEEL PARK
BARONY CHAMBERS CLOCK-TOWER
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How to
GET THERE
You can get a bus to Kirkintilloch from Glasgow Buchanan Bus Station. Or, get a train to Lenzie from Glasgow Queen Street and walk 2 miles.
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