Winter Gardens and the People's Palace Museum, Glasgow Green, Glasgow
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  GOOD THINGS TO SEE AND DO IN GLASGOW
PEOPLE'S PALACE MUSEUM, GLASGOW GREEN
All cities should have a museum that tells the story of how that city came to be, and this is Glasgow’s. As well as informative displays inside, there are also beautifully formed Winter Gardens attached to the building. Right at the entrance to the museum is a quite stunning fountain, and it’s worth making your way here for this alone. Within spitting distance you may sup ale in the West Brewing Company which is housed in an old carpet works with a decorative brick facade.
PROVAND'S LORDSHIP, CASTLE STREET
Sited in what was once the medieval heart of the city, this old house - the oldest in the city -  struggles to hold its own amidst bumper-to-bumper traffic on its doorstep. At the base of its external walls road salt is eating the sandstone away, and I would highly recommend that you pay it a visit before it falls down. It was built in the late 15th century, which is quite a long time ago. Lots of other stuff nearby, like the St Mungo’s Museum of Religious Life & Art, Glasgow Cathedral, and The Necropolis (good views over the city from there). Entry is free. [NOTE - You can pick up a leaflet titled 'Glasgow Necropolis Heritage Trail' at the Tourist Information Office in George Square. It's free, and gives good information on the history of the graveyard, architecture of the tombs, and of the many rich folk buried here.]
GLASGOW CATHEDRAL
Seen one cathedral, seen them all. Not true. For each has its own charm. Glasgow's is a solid grey lump of stone with little in the way of stone carvings, yet captivating nonetheless. This is where the city was born, where its patron saint lies buried, and within whose walls a spiritual peacefulness will most certainly descend. Its sturdiness and ability to withstand all that is thrown at it echoes the character of the people of Glasgow.
THE RIVER CLYDE WALKWAY
The section on the north of the river, between the city centre and the Riverside Museum, is a pleasant, invigorating walk that will give a real flavour of what the city is all about.
THE RIVERSIDE MUSEUM, 100 POINTHOUSE PLACE
Glasgow's new transport museum is located down by the River Clyde, at its junction with the River Kelvin. Inside, you will find a wonderful collection of cars and carriages and buses and lorries and trains and bicycles and many more things on wheels. And a tall ship: the Glenlee. There's even an old reconstructed street to allow you to glimpse the shops of yesteryear. But I think the most notable aspect is probably the building in which the Riverside Museum is housed. Never have I seen such a stunning structure. In addition, views over the River Clyde from the tearoom are out of this world. Magnificent [Entry to the museum and the Glenlee are both free.] [You can at times get a ferry to Govan from here.]
KELVINGROVE ART GALLERY AND MUSEUM
This is a fairytale palace of a building that could be totally empty of stuff and still be out of this world. With the stuff inside – everything from armour to dinosaurs and paintings – it is a place in which you may dose yourself with a combined tincture of reality and fantasia. Wonderful. (And the BrewDog pub is just across the road – what more could you possibly want?)
THE SOUPSAYER'S DIY DAY TOUR OF GLASGOW
The Soupsayer has devised a day tour for you. If you're not familiar with Glasgow then it may serve as a brief introduction to the city. If you are familiar with Glasgow, then it may be regarded as a good day out. The walk comprises a rough map and route details, one file for each. In order for you to print them out at full A4 size instead of a smaller web page size, you should click the links below and save the files to your computer (go to 'File' then 'Save As..' on your task bar near the top of the page). Then, open them using, for example, Windows Picture and Fax Viewer, and print them, adjusting your print preferences if required so as to give full A4 images. Each file should be printed out on either side of the same A4 sheet of paper. Please note that the complete tour is about five miles long. Click HERE for the Glasgow map, and HERE for route details. And remember, be careful out there and, most of all, have fun.



GOVAN - See separate entry in The Good Soup Guide

CLYDEBANK - See separate entry in The Good Soup Guide
THE GLASGOW POLICE MUSEUM, 30 BELL STREET
A very small and strangely disappointing museum about the history of Glasgow's police force. As you enter, a bell rings, and a group of retired constables look at you in the way that only police officers can. Two seconds in the door and already you feel guilty. This could be a much better museum if they combined it with the stuff kept in the museum at Strathclyde Police Headquarters - the one that is not generally seen by the public. Then you would have the opportunity to see such innovative delights as the police helmet with the flashing light on top. Yes, those were the days! I should probably also mention that the museum includes police uniforms from forces all around the world.
SUMMERLEE MUSEUM OF SCOTTISH INDUSTRIAL LIFE
A little outside of the city centre, in Coatbridge, but if you're a Fred Dibnah sort of character who cares about our lost industries and way of life (and I think most of us probably fit into that category), then it's a short hop on the train. There are steam engines and trams and a wonderful smell of oil and hard sweaty graft. (PS - it's free!) [Coatbridge Sunnyside is nearest railway station.]
THE TITAN CRANE, CLYDEBANK
One of few remnants of a great ship building industry on the River Clyde, The Titan Crane has been dusted down, given a going over with a shammy, and is now a tourist attraction. And, I have to say, a pretty good one at that. You can take a lift all the way to the top and soak up panoramic views over the river, including the slips where such majestic vessels as the Lusitania, HMS Hood, Queen Mary, and royal yacht Britannia were launched. [2013 - only open weekends May to Sep. Group bookings Mon-Fri by appt.]
THE WALLED GARDEN, BELLAHOUSTON PARK
If you arrive at the right time of year, the vibrant colours of the many flowers will leave you feeling quite simply wonderful. This has to be one of the best-kept walled gardens in Glasgow, if not the country. Heck, maybe even the world.
HUNTERIAN MUSEUM, UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW
A wonderful old museum - Scotland's oldest public museum - whose architectural splendour is worth a visit for that alone. You would be hard pushed to find a more beautiful set of rafters. Amidst the magnificence there are lots of really good things to see. There are, for example, deformed animal 'monstrosities', as we called them in the 18th century; a wooden operating table as used by Sir William MacEwen, and piles of objects relating to the Roman invasion of Scotland. Amongst all the Roman stuff you will find a large Ballista ball. Please allow me to quote:
'This stone launched by a Roman catapult and found in the destruction levels of Leckie broch, is different to the red sandstone which is most common within the site. It bears the characteristic heat cracking pattern seen on stones which have been made red-hot then suddenly cooled. One interpretation is that it was launched into the broch as a superheated missile which the inhabitants threw cold water on to prevent it from starting a fire.' Most fascinating.
Remember when visiting the Hunterian Museum to go to the viewpoint by the flagpole. The view from here is wonderful. [Museum closed Mondays.]
THE TENEMENT HOUSE, 145 BUCCLEUCH STREET
The Tenement House may be a little hard to find; you may have to ascend a steep hill to reach it. Is the effort worth it? Are cricket-balls red? Put quite simply, if in Glasgow, you should not miss The Tenement House. For truly this is a gem. It is an untouched time-capsule of a quality rarely found today. This is the past, and as soon as that door opens and you step into the gas-lit lobby you very much know you're in it. It is a typical Glasgow red sandstone tenement, built in 1892, and what you see is a perfectly-preserved example of how many folk lived in Glasgow in the late-Victorian/Edwardian period. The sturdy stone tenement was Glasgow's housing staple. They were found everywhere, from the poorer overcrowded quarters to the opulent West End. The Tenement House is a fine example of a flat for a fairly well-off family. There is no poverty here, although there was still a bed in the kitchen and a bed in the closet off the parlour. In fact, there was even a bed under the bed, so it could still be a bit cramped. [The Tenement House is open from March to October each year, between 1pm and 5pm each day. It's not far from Charing Cross - just walk up the steep Garnethill.]
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DIY Day Tour of Glasgow (with map)
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Provand's Lordship, Glasgow
Glasgow Cathedral
River Clyde Walkway in the city centre, Glasgow
Riverside Museum, 100 Pointhouse Place, Glasgow
Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow
The walled garden in Bellahouston Park, Glasgow
Clydebank's Titan Crane
Summerlee Museum of Scottish Industrial Life, near Glasgow
The Glasgow Police Museum, 30 Bell Street, Glasgow
Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow - exterior in 2012
Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow - interior in 2012
The Tenement House, 145 Buccleuch Street, Glasgow