Stairs leading up to Edinburgh Castle
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  GOOD THINGS TO SEE AND DO IN EDINBURGH
THE SCOTTISH PARLIAMENT
A great big modern structure near the foot of Edinburgh's Royal Mile. It's open to the public, and inside you can see where all the important decisions are made, like whether it's time for another ale or not.
MUSEUM OF EDINBURGH, 142 CANONGATE
There are museums on both sides of the Royal Mile here (that on the other side of the road is THE PEOPLE'S STORY), in addition to a churchyard where you can see the burial place (and a modern statue) of the poet Robert Fergusson. The museums give an excellent flavour of how Edinburgh came into existence.
MUSEUM OF CHILDHOOD, 42 HIGH STREET
Immerse yourself in memories; everything from bars of 'Five Boys' chocolate to dolls, Action Man, Meccano, and those penny-in-the-slot things you used to see at fairgrounds. Note: a few doors along there is a sweetie shop that makes its own fudge. If you wander inside you may be treated to a free delicious sample (don't say I told you).
ST GILES' CATHEDRAL, ROYAL MILE
It's nice to wander in here on a hot summer's day for no other reason than that it is always cool inside. This is a cathedral that has witnessed many of Edinburgh's key events. It is a place where you may recharge your physical and spiritual batteries.
THE REAL MARY KING'S CLOSE, HIGH STREET
An utterly fascinating attraction. It comprises a complete close (or wynd or lane or whatever you want to call it) that was somehow sealed centuries ago and then re-discovered. While the remains are a little ruinous, you can nevertheless still wander into what used to be people's homes and hear tales from your guide about the 'orrible things that went on. Oh, and did I mention ghosts? If, on leaving, you pause to wonder if you've seen anything at all, then slope off for an ale or two. That's my advice.
GLADSTONE'S LAND, 477B LAWNMARKET
This is an excellent opportunity to have a look inside one of the many tall, thin tenements that line streets in the Old Town. It's never as busy as the likes of the castle, and so there's room to breathe in here. You could perhaps do a bit of panting in the old furnished rooms to raise oxygen saturation levels before once again diving into the melee that is the Royal Mile.
THE SCOTCH WHISKY EXPERIENCE, 354 CASTLEHILL
Where experiences are concerned, this one's unusual in that it's pretty good. The highlight is without question a slow ride on a barrel. I mean, how often in life are you given the opportunity to do such a thing? And where, you might ask, does the barrel take you? Well, according to their literature, it's something like this... 'Journey through gently swaying fields of barley... avoid being ground through the Malt Mill before being spun and mashed in the Mash Tun... off to the turbulent wooden Washback with the sound of the sloshing Wash before the steaming and bubbling Pot Still,'  and so on. Not so much a spirituous experience as a visit to a peaty laundrette. There are also angels and magic and restful smells and flavours and secrets, although not necessarily in that order. This is the sort of attraction I often find myself strangely wishing to go around again and again and again. Bit like the spinning/drying cycle, I suppose.
EDINBURGH CASTLE
A magnificent castle with plenty to see, including the Stone of Destiny, Scotland's Crown Jewels, and views over the whole city all the way to the Firth of Forth and beyond. There's also plenty to hear, like the combined screams of a squillion tourists having fun, and the One o' Clock Gun. You could almost spend a whole day here peering into every nook and cranny and trying to determine the trajectory of a jobbie as it leaves the hole in the floor of each and every medieval closet.
THERE ARE SO MANY REALLY GOOD THINGS TO SEE AND DO IN THE CITY'S ROYAL MILE THAT YOU COULD SIMPLY START AT THE CASTLE AND POP YOUR HEAD IN EVERY DOORWAY BETWEEN THERE AND THE PALACE OF HOLYROODHOUSE. IF YOU FEEL A BLOW TO THE SIDE OF YOUR HEAD YOU'LL KNOW YOU'VE MISTAKENLY WANDERED INTO SOMEONE'S HOUSE.
VICTORIA STREET
You've just got to see this street. It's wonderful. Apart from being a visual joy to behold, it is overflowing with interesting shops selling everything from old books and maps to cheese and jokes and alchemic bottles of alcohol.
CALTON HILL
If you fancy a short walk with the promise of views all over Central Scotland, then this is it. The small hill (more a lump, than a hill) is located at the east end of Princes Street and can be accessed via steps from Waterloo Place. There's a sticky-up thing at the top (Nelson Monument) which you can enter and climb to the top for an intimate view of the inside of a cloud.
THE EDINBURGH DUNGEON, 31 MARKET STREET
I find these sort of things a bit too scary because invariably there's some audience participation and it's always me who gets picked for whatever gruesome spectacle they have in mind. Lots of live actors and buckets of blood and guts. Great.
PALACE OF HOLYROODHOUSE
If you started at the castle and have worked your way down the Royal Mile then your feet will probably feel like balloons. Pop in here, see where the queen stays, check out what is alleged to be ye olde blood stain, and then collapse on a bit of grass in the nearby park.
THE SOUPSAYER'S DIY DAY TOUR OF EDINBURGH
The Soupsayer has devised a day tour for you. If you're not familiar with Edinburgh then it may serve as a brief introduction to the city. If you are familiar with Edinburgh, then it may be regarded as a good day out. The walk comprises a rough map and route details, one file for each. In order for you to print them out at full A4 size instead of a smaller web page size, you should click the links below and save the files to your computer (go to 'File' then 'Save As..' on your task bar near the top of the page). Then, open them using, for example, Windows Picture and Fax Viewer, and print them, adjusting your print preferences if required so as to give full A4 images. Each file should be printed out on either side of the same A4 sheet of paper. Please note that the tour has some steep slopes. Click HERE for the Edinburgh map, and HERE for route details. And remember, be careful out there and, most of all, have fun.



LEITH - See separate entry in The Good Soup Guide

DUDDINGSTON - See separate entry in The Good Soup Guide
THE JOHN MUIR  WAY - A LITTLE WALK
The John Muir Way is a long-distance walking route that runs for 134 miles right across central Scotland, from Helensburgh to Dunbar, and a little bit more. You don't have to walk it all at once. The section between Edinburgh and Prestonpans, for example, is around 10 miles, while the section from Edinburgh back to Queensferry is 16 miles. [CLICK HERE FOR A SPECIAL JOHN MUIR WAY PAGE WITH INTERACTIVE MAP AND ROUTE.]
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DIY Day Tour of Edinburgh (with map)
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Edinburgh Castle, from the Grassmarket
The barrel ride in the Scotch Whisky Experience in Edinburgh
Gladstone's Land, Lawnmarket, Edinburgh
Spooky goings on at The Real Mary King's Close, Edinburgh
St Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh
Museum of Childhood, 42 High Street, Edinburgh
Rear of the Museum of Edinburgh, Canongate, Edinburgh
The Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh
Palace of Holyroodhouse, Edinburgh
The Edinburgh Dungeon
Admiring the view from Edinburgh's Calton Hill
Victoria Street, Edinburgh
Check our shop for books on Edinburgh
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