Preston Mill, East Linton
The delightful centre of East Linton, with the old water fountain and Big Jessie the clock
Approaching East Linton over Linton Bridge
East Linton
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In my well-thumbed 1920s guide book (Muirhead's Scotland), it is said that Room and Board could be had at The Crown in East Linton for ten shillings and sixpence. In today's money this is fifty-two-and-a-half new pence, an amount that would barely buy a loaf of bread. But while some things have changed, it's nice to see that other things have not, for The Crown Hotel still exists, and a fine hotel it is, too.
There are many things that have not changed in East Linton. Which is a good thing, if you ask me. For I have found in life that when things change they generally do so for the worst, not the better as we are so often led to believe. The village bristles with eighteenth century cottages, and retains a timeless charm that is most pleasing to the body and soul. The first impression I had during my day here was a good one, and I was soon scampering around like an excited child. Sometimes it's the simplest of things that give that initial impression. For me it was the approach over the 16th century bridge and the frontage of a small shop. Adorning the facade of a pharmacy was one of those three-dimensional shop signs, on this occasion a large mortar and pestle. Shops used to have such signs. You might get a boot on the wall of a shoe shop, or a hat for a shop which sold hats. Nowadays we shun such visual delights in favour of A-framed signs that block pavements and which are about as visually appealing as a wart on the nose of an ogre.
We have so lost our way. But not in East Linton.
PRESTON MILL
EAST LINTON - FOUNTAIN & CLOCK
THE BRIDGE AT EAST LINTON
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How to
GET THERE

You can get a bus to East Linton from Dunbar, which has a direct train service from Edinburgh.
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