Dunoon pier
On the ferry to Dunoon
Looking along Argyll Street in Dunoon
Dunoon
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In Dunoon there are fairies, and they all stay in a little glen. In this glen the fairies once invited human folk to marvel at the wisps of mist that curled and swam around the toadstools and trees and silken fairy homes. The head fairy was called Morag, a firm leader who organised daily chores like ensuring all the streams tinkled, all the dells were bathed in mist, and the Highland cows roared on cue at precisely twelve-of-the-clock every day to both scare away goblins and let the fairies and humans know that all was well. But some goblins were very persistent, and before long some fairies had to move. One group, under the leadership of Puck, moved a few miles north of Dunoon to their own glen near Strath Eachaig. And so Morag's Fairy Glen became abandoned, bar a few stalwarts who stood guard, doing their utmost to make life hard for the goblins. And what, you might rightly ask, am I rabbitting on about? Well, I think many visitors to Dunoon in the past will remember Morag's Fairy Glen. It was a magical place where grown-ups became like children and marvelled at the little folk who hide in our world. Sadly, the glen became a tad uncared for, and closed for a while. But do not despair. The humans and the fairies have held a meeting, and Morag's group have opted to return. And as the old saying goes, 'With the return of fairies to Morag's Glen all of Scotland will prosper and the King shall return.' Puck may be just a few miles away, but if you stand and listen you'll hear him communicating with Morag courtesy of a tiny fairy flute. It's that barely discernible sound you hear with each lull of the Berry Burn.
THE OLD PIER AT DUNOON
ON THE FERRY TO DUNOON
ARGYLL STREET, DUNOON
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How to
GET THERE

You can get a ferry to Dunoon from Gourock, which has a direct train service from Glasgow Central Railway Station.
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