The Titan Crane, Clydebank
Clydebank Town Hall, now the Clydebank Museum and Art Gallery
Clydebank shopping centre and the Forth & Clyde Canal
Clydebank
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I remember as a small boy sitting at a table in a cafe or bakers, upstairs in a tenement on Dumbarton Road in Clydebank. I don't remember what I was eating or drinking. Memory can be so selective. That tenement has long gone. The tiny newsagent/tobacconist that I used to stand at while waiting for my Dad opposite the gates to John Brown's shipyard has also long gone. My Dad's gone too, as has John Brown's shipyard. Even those big gates have vanished. There is in fact practically nothing left of Clydebank, just memories and isolated old remnants sitting forlornly amidst a weed-strewn wasteland.
Clydebank only existed and blossomed as a town in the late nineteenth century because of John Brown's shipyard and Singer's sowing machine factory. Growth of Clydebank was phenomenal. It grew from merely a farm or two in the late Victorian period to having a population of forty-odd thousand by the beginning of the twentieth century. Stout stone tenements lined expanding streets bustling with men and women in employment. It's hard to imagine that in Singer's - Europe's largest sowing-machine factory - there were once 14,000 people employed. Thousands of other folk were employed in the shipyard. Without John Brown's and Singer's there is almost no reason for Clydebank to exist, and the town is in danger of being erased. Today, Clydebank town centre is merely a shopping centre, a shopping centre just like every other shopping centre in the country. It would make you weep, so it would.
THE TITAN CRANE
CLYDEBANK TOWN HALL
FORTH & CLYDE CANAL
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How to
GET THERE

You can get a train to Clydebank from Glasgow Queen Street or Glasgow Central railway stations.
Scotland’s online tourist guide – tartan hippo logo