Clachan of Campsie
St Machan's graveyard, Clachan of Campsie
Strathkelvin Railway Path
Clachan of Campsie
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This is a teensy weensy hamlet nestling at the foot of the Campsie Fells. It has its very own glen, said to be 'one of the prettiest glens near Glasgow,' and is a most picturesque place. It was at one time known simply as Campsie, and I'm not entirely sure when or why they changed it to Clachan of Campsie. 'Clachan' is a Scots word meaning 'small village', so perhaps someone important thought to emphasise the petite nature of the place. Or perhaps there was a bit of a phlegm problem in the village and they reckoned that having to say 'clachan' several times a day was just the thing to loosen up all that mucous. Try it for yourself... see? (For those of you unfamiliar with the pronunciation of Scots words, the 'ch' part of the word should be uttered as if one were clearing one's throat.) Perhaps in years to come doctors will forgo all their pills and potions when dealing with respiratory ailments and instead dispense instructions on how many times per day one should say, 'clachan.'
Clachan! Clachan! Clachan! Goodness, I feel better already. Chist the job for hayfever.
Campsie Glen is a bewitching place with a few wood carvings dotted here and there, a small waterfall, and paths that lead up into the wondrous Campsie Fells. This is where Tom Weir, that lovable hiking TV presenter with the bobble hat and the big red nose, first escaped the madness of Glasgow as a boy and headed for the hills. It's not hard to see why this little hamlet with its glen had such an effect on him. It is just beautiful.
CLACHAN OF CAMPSIE
ST MACHAN'S GRAVEYARD
STRATHKELVIN RAILWAY PATH
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How to
GET THERE

You can get a bus to Clachan of Campsie from Glasgow Buchanan Bus Station.
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