Promenade walk and golden sands at Burntisland
Old fountain and view from Burntisland towards Kinghorn
The old Porte Cinema building in the East Porte area of Burntisland
Burntisland
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If you approach Burntisland on foot from Aberdour on the Fife Coastal Path you may start to nurture slight feelings of foreboding. For as you get ever nearer you start to see big tall cranes and warehouses and great housing schemes that don't look all that purty. Burntisland, you may begin to think, does not perhaps have the same rustic red-pantiled charm found in so many of the villages and towns in the East Neuk of Fife. But as the ground passes beneath your feet you reckon there's no real harm in that. For where there are cranes and warehouses there is employment, and far too many of those purty little towns don't seem to have a great deal of that sort of thing going on. As Burntisland gets close you wonder how folk can live in such horrid boxes and not be somehow blighted by the subconscious weight of their bleak surroundings. There is no reason why housing for the working man cannot be architecturally pleasant and spiritually uplifting. And then you reckon you're perhaps thinking a bit too much and it's time for soup. So you weave around the houses and head up a road where the buildings look a little older and more appealing. But at the top of that hill the grey boxes come once again into view and you conclude that Burntisland is teasing you. And it is. For it's only when you reach the town proper that Burntisland's rugged architectural beauty starts to shine, a beauty that had me scampering to and fro trying to see everything all at once and oh heck I'd better slurp some soup. Oh the joy of exploring new unseen places.
VIEW OF BURNTISLAND
THE LINKS, BURNTISLAND
EAST PORTE AREA, BURNTISLAND
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How to
GET THERE


You can get a train to Burntisland from Edinburgh.
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