Brechin High Street and the Townhouse Museum
The Aldbar Stone - Pictish cross-slab in Brechin Cathedral
Brechin Cathedral and Round Tower
Brechin
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Most towns and cities in Scotland were probably once villages formed when a few folk built their houses beside a source of water. Water is crucial to life, and you don't want to travel too far to get it. In these villages the people survived by either farming or carrying out work for the rich man who lived in the nearby castle, cathedral or country house, tending his tatties and ironing his smalls. There would have been some industry in these villages, for folk need things like clothes and shoes and food and drink and a means to light their home. So, many villages had their own candlemaker, their own brewer of ale, their own shoemaker, blacksmith, butcher and so on. Most grew a little under their own steam and held weekly markets where surplus goods could be sold to further make ends meet. When the Industrial Revolution happened, man suddenly discovered the means to mass produce things, and great factories sprang up, often near those same water sources. There, they churned out masses of stuff. The folk in the villages found work in these factories, and the villages grew to became towns, their occupants now wholly reliant on the monster in their midst. In Brechin they once made linen and paper. They don't any more, and as a result Brechin is dying a death. For there is now insufficient work for all those folk who came to live here to work in mills like the Den Burn Works. But during Brechin's growth, the townsfolk built many nice buildings, and they remain to this day, a heritage that patiently stands and waits for tourists like you and me.
BRECHIN HIGH STREET
THE ALDBAR STONE
CATHEDRAL AND ROUND TOWER
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How to
GET THERE
You can get a bus to Brechin from Montrose, which has a direct train service from Glasgow Queen Street and Edinburgh.
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