Balloch Road, Balloch
View of Loch Lomond from the Duncan Mills Memorial Slipway at Balloch
View from Loch Lomond Shores, Balloch
Balloch
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Balloch's quite a small place. There's essentially just the one street trundling through the village, lined with establishments in which one might eat or drink or sleep. In some of these establishments you may even do all three, although not all at exactly the same time. (Man has yet to master the art of both sleeping and drinking simultaneously.) It seems that everything that there is to do in the village that carries with it a modicum of excitement involves water. You can walk beside the water, take a cruise on the water, sit on grass and look at the water, or look at fish and other creatures that actually live in the very water itself. The water at Balloch is indeed of such importance that they've gone and built a retail development right beside it, and while I am not generally one for modern shopping centres and the like, I have to say that this one's pretty good. Loch Lomond Shores, as it is called, is architecturally interesting. It was either designed by a first-rate architect or one who was drunk and incapable of drawing a straight line. For Loch Lomond Shores is a curvy sort of place. And while admiring the curves you may pause awhile and look out over the water. Without water Balloch wouldn't really be much to write home about. If the River Leven and Loch Lomond both conspired to dry-up overnight, then Balloch would find itself at a loose end. Fish would flounder, birds would squawk, and visitors would gaze at the places where once there was water and wonder what on earth to do with themselves. So go to Balloch now, the Scottish village with water.
THE MAIN ROAD THROUGH BALLOCH
'MAID OF THE LOCH' AT BALLOCH
VIEW FROM LOCH LOMOND SHORES
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How to
GET THERE

You can get a train to Balloch from Glasgow Queen Street or Glasgow Central railway stations (lower level).
Scotland’s online tourist guide – tartan hippo logo