Abernethy round tower and mercat cross in 2013
The jougs and a Pictish symbol stone at the base of Abernethy round tower - 2013
Old cottages in Abernethy in 2013
Abernethy
RETURN TO THE GOOD SOUP GUIDE
A - Z
In Abernethy, they don't make Abernethy biscuits... WAAAAGGGHH! The name of that biscuit actually comes from Doctor John Abernethy, who wasn't from Abernethy but 'invented' them (can biscuits be 'invented'?) way back in some-time-or-other as a healthy biscuit that would improve one's digestion. Healthy biscuits - almost sounds like some sort of promotional campaign that a supermarket might come up with!
Abernethy is, I have to say, a rather attractive little place. There's not a great deal to it, but what little there is feels good. It's got a tower, a round tower so unusual that it is only one of two on the Scottish mainland. Part of the tower goes back as far as the 11th century, and may have been constructed by Irish masons. If you look at Abernethy's past, you see that the Culdees were involved. The Culdees were a religious group who seemed to like building unusual towers. There's one, for example, at Muthill, although that one's not round. The Culdees' coat of arms or whatever you wish to call it includes a red hand, and why that should be I'm not entirely sure. The red hand is an ancient symbol.
The main thing about Abernethy is its Pictish roots. It was indeed at one time the southern Pictish Capital of Scotland, so it was an important place. Today, you can still see remnants of that Pictish greatness, like in the carved symbol stone at the entrance to the old church, whose symbols include a hammer. But is it a Pictish hammer, or the hammer of an Irish monk?
ABERNETHY ROUND TOWER
JOUGS & PICTISH SYMBOL STONE
OLD ABERNETHY COTTAGES
Advertisements
How to
GET THERE


You can get a bus to Abernethy from Perth, which has a main-line railway station.
Scotland’s online tourist guide – tartan hippo logo