Buildings and hills at Aberfoyle
The Rob Roy Way between Drymen and Aberfoyle, showing Victorian waterworks
The Rob Roy Way - heading for Aberfoyle from Drymen
Aberfoyle
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If you look at Ordnance Survey Landranger map number 57, 'Stirling & The Trossachs', which has a scale of 1:50000 or one-and-a-quarter inches to a mile, you'll see that Aberfoyle sits near two folds on the map. It is what I like to term a two folds town. Now, to be honest, I hate two folds towns. Visiting a two folds town means that when walking or cycling in the area you're going to have to engage in a frantic bit of map-folding, folding and footering with it this way and that and at times throwing the whole thing up in the air with a small yelp of frustration. You do, indeed, need to be an expert in folding your map, and I would only visit Aberfoyle if you have that well-recognised qualification: an SCE O-Grade in 'Map Footering', with at the very least a B-pass.
When you're in Aberfoyle you'll more than likely need your map, as there are loads of fine countryside walks and cycle routes in the area. In fact, my old 'Blue Guide To Scotland' had this to say, 'The surrounding scenery, without being grand, is very broken and romantic, and the district is a favourite with walkers.' And that pretty much sums it up, it's all very nice, but nothing that will blow your socks off. That said, there are walks and cycle routes to the south, to the north, the east and the west, and Aberfoyle may be regarded as an ideal place to stay while tackling all these wonderful paths and tracks. And you only have to head a few miles north to come face to face with Ben A'an, a little mountain that's as grand as they come.
ABERFOYLE STREET SCENE
WATERWORKS ON ROB ROY WAY
THE ROB ROY WAY
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How to
GET THERE
You can get a direct bus to Aberfoyle from Stirling. There are also buses from Glasgow, although generally you will have to change bus at Balfron.
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