Aberdour High Street and Shore Road
A lovely little squint building at the head of the harbour in Aberdour
Aberdour Castle
Aberdour
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Aberdour feels a bit different to other little towns or villages in Fife and its East Neuk. It appears to be lacking the sloping winding lanes, the colourful painted facades in blues, yellows and greens, and red pantiles are about as rare as hen's teeth. It is, in fact, a bit grey looking. But what it lacks in the red pantiles department is more than made up for in other areas. For Aberdour has a squinty little building down by the harbour. You just can't beat a squinty little building, one in which no two walls are plumb and the sea is close to winning a long long battle. I would in fact visit Aberdour for no other reason than to stand and stare at this wondrous structure, and perhaps to offer my shoulder as support to stop it all collapsing in a heap.
Aberdour also has a castle, and it too has some curious and no less amazing architectural qualities. At some point in the past a chunk of it fell off. When it hit the ground it did not break up into stones and rubble, but remained as one huge intact chunk. It's nothing short of astonishing that it remains in this state today, and every time I see that monstrous lump I wonder if a few buckets of glue might just put it back up where it belongs.
Aberdour is not short of architectural wonder. In the Woodside Hotel there is an intact roof from the saloon of an old ship. The 'Orontes 1' was launched in 1902, and the wonderful carved wood and stained-glass that you can see was created by Oscar Paterson, a stained-glass artist of considerable renown, and a true Glasgow Boy.
ABERDOUR HIGH STREET
SQUINT BUILDING BY THE HARBOUR
ABERDOUR CASTLE
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How to
GET THERE


You can get a train to Aberdour from Edinburgh.
Scotland’s online tourist guide – tartan hippo logo